Walking Barefoot on this Earth

“Soil is earth’s barefoot and when we walk barefoot, two barefoot touches each other with love!”
– Mehmet Murat Ildan –

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Two things would happen when I came home from work after long and intense hours: one would be to have a maximum of one minute elapse between walking in the front door and getting into my flannel pyjamas. The second would be to throw off my shoes and walk barefoot for the rest of the night. There is something sensuously delicious about feeling the earth under our feet … and now we have science to prove it!

For years, studies have been conducted on the negative charge carried by the Earth and how this affects those who live on it. This charge, they discovered, is electron-rich and in theory, has the potential to supply humans with rich antioxidants and free radical destroying electrons.

One of the first brainiacs behind these theories was the 1952 German physicist Professor Schuman, who, in a very simplistic summary, discovered that the earth had a pulse. In fact, it was measured and confirmed at 7.83 Hz and became known as “The Schuman Resonance”.

Fast forward a few decades and the studies have increased dramatically with fascinating findings. For example, an article published in the Journal of Environmental and Public Health discusses the importance of barefoot contact with the earth, also known as ‘grounding’ or ‘earthing’, as proving to “create a stable internal bio-electrical environment for the normal functions of all body systems.” The study bemoans how our modern lifestyle has “separated humans from the primordial flow of Earth’s electrons” and points to the possibilities that the recent decades of increased chronic pain and illness, immune disorders, and inflammatory diseases, have a direct link to our disconnection with the Earth’s surface.

The interest in what happens when we are ‘grounded’ or ‘earthed’ has resulted in numerous amount of significant research. One study found that blood urea concentrations are lower in people who are earthed during exercise as it “inhibits hepatic protein catabolism or increases renal urea excretion.” Another study conducted by Gaetan Chevalier, PhD, and James Oschman, PhD, concluded that grounding reduces blood viscosity and clumping and therefore seems to be one of the “simplest and most profound interventions for helping reduce cardiovascular risk and cardiovascular events.” For a summary of some of the recent findings, please see this article by Arjun Walia.

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So it turns out that shoes, although beneficial for many events, are not always your best friend or fashion accessory. Your glorious bare feet are! It has to do with our body’s functions that are based on bio-electric processes, and they work best with a well-established baseline … and you cannot get any better than Earth. So being disconnected from Earth causes stress because our bodies lose their reference points for operating and we deny our bodies the bridge it needs to allow free electrons from the ground to travel through our body and rejuvenate our cells.

So the big lesson that all this holds?

Get dirty in 2018!

Get those shoes off. Walk in the garden, forest and beach. Lie on the grass. Let your bum make contact with the Earth as you watch a sunset (Disclaimer: I recommend that bum of yours remains clothed in public spaces to avoid arrest!)

It also confronts us again with the fact that humans have raped and pillaged the Earth for centuries, propelled by insatiable greed and consumerism. We need to STOP. Getting our feet dirty reminds us to walk humbly and carefully. When we walk barefoot and look back, it shows us the ideal ‘footprint’ we should one day leave behind as we are but ‘dust’ (soil) and in a mysterious way we are connected to this Earth we walk on …

“Walk as if you are kissing the earth with your feet.”
– Thich Nhat Hanh –

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Thin Places: Where Heaven and Earth Embrace

“Take off your sandals, for the place where you are standing is holy ground.”
Exodus 3:5

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Last year I visited Elk, or Lyck as it was known to my family. The town of my ancestors. I stood on the shores of the lake that held so many of my childhood fantasies. Fantasies that were fed by my grandmother’s mesmerising stories. I walked through the vibrant forest, up a hill, overlooking that magical place of a thousand lakes. I could hear whispers from the past, a distinct sense of the closeness of another dimension. It hit me. I was again standing amidst a Thin Place.

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The Celts coined the term ‘Thin Place’ for spaces and moments where the distance between heaven and earth seems almost non-existent. There is a Celtic saying that heaven and earth are only three feet apart, but in the Thin Places the distance is even smaller. My guess would be that the first person to utter the term probably did so in an Irish brogue, as they stood in wonder, looking at the wind-swept isle of Iona or the rocky peaks of Croagh Patrick.

Thin Places confuse our senses. We suddenly see the world in a different light. Our perceptions change. With breathless wonder we encounter the Divine and it changes us. For people who hold to a faith, Thin Places are those places where we feel most strongly connected to God’s presence.

“Thin Places,” the Celts call this space,
Both seen and unseen,
Where the door between the world
And the next is cracked open for a moment
And the light is not all on the other side.
God shaped space. Holy.”

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As I stood looking around by the lake at Elk, memories came flooding back. I was familiar with Thin Places. I remember the moment I stepped onto the edge of the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania, that holy hush that descends as all words fall short in the face of such beauty. Or as I watched the sea eagles swoop through pristine Norwegian fjords. I recall the Thin Place moment as I trudged through the dark, cold catacombs along the via Appia in Rome, sensing that I was surrounded by a great cloud of witnesses. And then there are those Thin Places of life and death. The moment when I took my newborn into my arms and marvelled at the wonder of life. Or when I held the hand of my dying mother on one warm and balmy December evening, and watched her pass over to another dimension filled with light.

So what makes a Thin Place ‘thin’? Not every beautiful place we encounter is a ‘Thin Place’ and it is not necessarily marked because of its tranquility. Perhaps a Thin Place can best be identified through how it effects us, changes us, strips us, and transforms us. We can’t really plan day trips to Thin Places. Rather, it seems, that Thin Places find us. Those mindful moments when suddenly we catch a glimpse of heaven and earth, unencumbered. It is that moment of recognition that Jacob experienced and exclaimed: “God is in this place — truly. And I didn’t even know it!”

It is the moment we passionately wake up:

“Indeed, it is a lovely testimony to the fullness and integrity of an experience or a stage of life that it intensifies towards the end into a real frontier that cannot be crossed without the heart being passionately engaged and woken up. At this threshold a great complexity of emotion comes alive: confusion, fear, excitement, sadness, hope.” John O’Donohue

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As I stand on the threshold of a new and different tomorrow, I also sense this is a Thin Place. I feel like the last few decades, lived in a blur of hurry and productivity, have given way to a rhythm of grace, and of seeing and hearing with an ever increasing sense of wonder. It has not been a comfortable place. I don’t think Thin Places are intended to be. Rather, it has been a place of irrevocable change of the way I view and relate to the world and who I am.

What about you? Can you identify some Thin Places in your life? What was it about them that made them Thin Places? How are you different because of those moments?

You only have one life to live and it’s not as long as we’d like to imagine. May you resist the temptation to live it in the way others expect of you. May you live deeply and not be asleep when the sun rises. May your very life be the sacrament of a Thin Place for you.

“A sacrament is when something holy happens. It is transparent time, time which you can see through to something deep inside time … you are apt to catch a glimpse of the almost unbearable preciousness and mystery of life.” Frederick Buechner

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