The Advent Tradition

O come, Thou Day-Spring, come and cheer
Our Spirits by Thine Advent here
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night
And death’s dark shadows put to flight.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.

Advent

Advent is all about anticipation and preparation. It comes from the Latin word ‘Adventus’, which means ‘coming’. It is a tradition observed by many Christians around the world and marks the beginning of a new liturgical year for many Western churches. It covers four Sundays and begins on the Sunday closest to 30 November, which is the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle. It is a season of anticipating the birth of Christ and looks to the time when he returns. It is a season of great joy.

Advent probably had its beginnings in the 4th or 5th century in Spain and Gaul, when new Christians began to prepare themselves for baptism. During the Middle Ages people began to associate Advent with the second coming of Christ – the Greek word for ‘Adventus’ is ‘Parousia’, which holds theological concepts of Christ’s return. In more modern times, Advent is mainly associated with the anticipation of the Nativity on Christmas Day.

My early childhood memories of Christmas time would always include an Advent Calendar, even though ours was not a religious household. The calendar is like a large poster with twenty-four little doors, one is opened every day starting on the 1st December, revealing a picture that points to the Nativity. Importantly, each one that I opened also contained a chocolate. The Advent Calendar tradition began in Germany in the 1800s and from there spread to the rest of Europe and North America.

novelty-advent-calendar

The Advent wreath also emerged in northern Europe. In the icy winter nights people would bundle evergreens into a circular shape, symbolising eternal life. Candles where lit on the wreath, bringing cheer, and wistful thoughts of Spring. By the sixteenth century, people were making Advent wreaths like we know them today. Advent wreaths hold four candles: three purple and one rose coloured. The three purple candles symbolise hope, peace, and love, and are lit on the first, second, and fourth Sundays of Advent. The rose coloured candle, symbolising joy, is lit on the third Sunday. Some people place a fifth candle in the middle of the wreath that is lit on Christmas Day. It is white and recounts the story of the angels and the birth of Christ.

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Some people fast certain foods during Advent. Others get to baking. My grandparents spent hours preparing German Stollen and Advent Biscuits. There are many recipes available. Others see the month of December as sacred and use Advent to reflect and journal. Over the last few years, I have enjoyed a quiet retreat at the start of Advent. For those who would like some recommendations for Daily Advent Meditation:

1. Preparing for Christmas written by Richard Rohr.
2. Advent and Christmas Wisdom written by Henri Nouwen.
3. God is in the Manger: Reflections on Advent and Christmas written by Dietrich    Bonhoeffer.

and for Narnia fans …
5. Advent in Narnia: Reflections for the Season written by Heidi Haverkamp.

This year Advent begins on Sunday the 29th November. If you have never done so, why not consider establishing some of your own Advent traditions and reflections? If you are not religious, perhaps perceive this month as the Grand Final of the year – spend some time planning and anticipating a coming year?

Advent is a season of joy and hope. In a world where violence assaults our senses every time we engage in social media or watch a graphic news description, God knows we need Advent. A season that reminds us to anticipate a different tomorrow and to be grateful of the stunning Good News of Immanuel – With Us Is God.

Waiting — that cold, dry period of life when nothing seems to be enough and something else beckons within us — is the grace that Advent comes to bring. It stands before us, within us, pointing to the star for which the wise ones from the East are only icons of ourselves.
– Joan Chittister
o-come-Emmanuel
 

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